RIP Will & Grace. PLUS: Tuca & Bertie fallout. AND: Pointless Australia host speaks out!

Always Be Watching is by Dan Barrett who is done with this week.

Will & Grace will again come to an end. The 11th season, its 3rd since the recent revival, will be its last.

“In 2016, Bob Greenblatt came to us with the idea of doing a 10-episode reboot of ‘Will & Grace,’” said Mutchnick, Kohan and Burrows. “They say you can’t go home again, but we did. And now, three seasons and 52 episodes later, we’re even more proud of something we never thought we’d get a chance to do again. We have had a once-in-a-lifetime experience twice. And for that, we owe a double debt of gratitude to NBC, this show’s supportive and caring home since day one.”

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

The comedy joins 'The Good Place' and 'Blindspot' as NBC series wrapping their runs next season.

For those who pirate TV and movies, Plex is the secret sauce that makes curation of your home library manageable.

The Verge have published this article singing its praises:

Because even though piracy has become a lot less worth doing in the golden age of streaming, it’s making a comeback as it’s now more inconvenient to figure out how to legally stream the things you want to see. My inbox is a wasteland of free trials canceled just in the nick of time. That means if you’re technically savvy, maintaining a Plex server becomes a calculation of how much you’re willing to pay for convenience. If you’re someone who has access to one of those servers, on the other hand, the calculation is easier: why bother paying when you can just stream from your friends?

For what it’s worth: I personally don’t endorse piracy - I’m especially not comfortable with the justification of doing it because you don’t want to subscribe to ‘yet another streaming service’ when there really aren’t that many and most people saying that are justifying not having to subscribe to a service in addition to Netflix. But… Plex does a great job at what it does. And there are huge gaps in the market when it comes to a legitimate third-party solution for playing legally-purchased video files and being able to store them in a library away from the one provided by a vendor. DRM cripples that, but a man can dream…

Source: The Verge


NBCUniversal’s streaming service will launch in the US in April 2020. The yet-to-be-named service will use the same digital infrastructure that powers Sky Now in the UK. It will be advertising-supported and be available to anyone with a traditional cable subscription for free, but also available to other viewers with a monthly subscription fee.

Source: Variety


Yesterday Netflix cancelled animated show Tuca & Bertie. There was a mini-outcry about it on Twitter, but already I’m seeing less of it and I’d assume within a few days people will have moved on.

One of the people citing displeasure was Adam Ruins Everything host Adam Conover. He’s also a voice actor on the show and is the long-time partner of the show’s creator/showrunner Lisa Hanawalt. Conover fired off a very long thread of tweets, but this is the one that jumped out at me. It’s something that I see often when people are upset a Netflix show has been cancelled:

The thing with a Netflix cancellation is that they actually do know how many people are watching - they know how many episodes they watch in a row, they know what the series completion rate is, and all sorts of other details. Because they control the platform and it is digitally connected, Netflix have all of that data. It doesn’t matter if a show is a critical darling and Twitter seems to be alight with all sorts of enthusiastic chatter - Netflix have the very hard data on what viewership of the show actually was.

Seems weird to me that Adam, the know-it-all expert from Adam Ruins Everything, should probably know that.

If the show has been cancelled after just one season, the most likely answer is that despite critical enthusiasm, it didn’t keep viewers watching.

Image result for tuca and birdie

Mark Humphries, the former host of Aussie game show Pointless and longtime FoABW), has given a candid interview in which he detailed his time with the show and put part of the blame of the shows failure on the very tight condensed format (half the length of the UK version).

“Andrew and I had so little time together. Suddenly we were doing promotional photos, recording promos when we hadn’t even recorded an episode. Some of the kinks of the show were still being worked out. Because they had taken a 45 minute format and condensed it to 22 minutes some chunks had to go. They were still working that out when I got there,” he says.

Image result for mark humphries

And finally…

The new trailer for Zombieland 2 looks like a lot of fun. I’m absolutely on board for it.

Except… what’s with the joke at the end about the doppelgangers of the Zombieland crew? It’s a joke taken straight from zombie comedy Shaun of The Dead.